A blog in which I ramble on about drunken boxing…

Drunken boxing is one of my favourite styles of performative kung fu to watch. I am partial to this kind of dance-like material in martial arts films. As you watch and wait for that penultimate moment when the swaying drunken fighter finally overbalances and falls, and then catch your breath to see what new position…

Tai Chi Master – Characters and Actors

According to my notes, the Chinese title for this film is Tai Ji Zhang San Feng. How does this literally translate? I am assuming that Tai Ji refers to the martial art that I know as Tai Chi. I know that Zhang San Feng is the name of the character who, according to myth, invented…

Jet Li as Wong Fei Hung in Once Upon A Time In China – Part 1 – Acting

  “Jet Li incarnates a radiant, but intangible, masculinity...”          Leon Hunt commenting on Once Upon A Time in China in Kung Fu Cult Masters, p. 146  Once Upon A Time in China (OUTIC) is a seminal film in the Hong Kong Martial Arts film genre. An unexpected box office hit when it was released in the…

Updated Bibliography

I am blogging rather a lot about martial arts movies. It is not part of an academic or professional practice. It is just something I am doing for fun. And also, for fun, I read about these movies or listen to film commentaries when time allows. I make sure that if I use ideas or…

The Master – Random Thoughts

Starring Jet Li and Yuen Wah, directed by Tsui Hark, choreography by Yuen Wah And with a blast of nasty canto pop we are into The Master, directed by Tsui Hark, starring Jet Li and Yuen Wah, and choreographed by Yuen Wah. Below is a list of random thoughts that occurred to me as I…

Dragon Fight

Well... there's not much I can say about this somewhat glum and tedious film. A point of novelty is that a young Stephen Chow has a large supporting part and this is the only film he has ever made with Jet Li. Both of them were in the early stages of their careers, and neither…

Martial Arts of Shaolin: Blog No. 2

This blog is the second half of a previous blog which can be found here. However, for me, there are disatisfying aspects to this film. The usual foul cantopop type of score that is often a feature of chopsockies from this era seems to be particularly over powering in Martial Arts of Shaolin. I mean,…

Martial Arts of Shaolin, Blog No. 1

Martial Arts of Shaolin  Why did I use kung fu to make movies – to display the art and aestheticize fist fighting. Lau Kar Leung. (Hong Kong Film Archive 1999:89).  As Trapata's comments suggest, the celebration of male heroism was inextricable from the commodification of male beauty”. Leon Hunt, Kung Fu Cult Masters, p. 55…